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British Invasion Open Mic Night Set for April 27th at Grimaldi’s, Clifton, NJ

image004Grimaldi’s Coal Brick Oven Pizzeria, of Clifton, is pleased to announce that it will be hosting The British Invasion.

The British Invasion is a monthly open mic night that is exclusively dedicated to the songs of British Invasion. Any Band, Musician, Singer or Fan of music of the British Invasion are invited to participate in this unique evening of Great Food, Spirits and Music.

Reservations are recommended!  Time slots are reserved on a first come first serve basis. Musicians or bands who sign up to play will have 20 minutes of performance time.  Once everyone has finished their individual sets, there will be a group jam.  Each player or group who perform can receive a video and audio recording (If Available) as well as digital pictures of their performance for use on their individual websites, or social media outlets. 

Performers are asked to bring just their instruments. All amps, microphones, cables and sound equipment will be supplied by Cartier Productions, who is promoting and producing the event for Grimaldi’s.   No drums will be allowed or supplied.  To reserve a spot contact Vince Cartier at vcartier@verizon.net or call 201.323.2899.

Grimaldi’s continue to ensure that future generations will able to experience their distinctive and truly authentic pizza. Their fresh ingredients, handmade mozzarella, ‘secret recipe’ dough and pizza sauce make them the most award-winning pizzeria in the United States.  Grimaldi’s Coal Brick Oven Pizzeria is located at 1296 Van Houten Avenue, Clifton, NJ

Looking Back at Last Week’s Three Bruce Springsteen’s MetLife Stadium Shows in NJ!

This is a great overview of last weeks three Concerts at MetLife Stadium I hope you enjoy reading as much as I did.  Once again, The Springsteen Information Center wants to thank Stan Goldstein of The Star-Ledger/NJ.COM for this post. The Springsteen Information Center values his insight, The Springsteen Information Center values his passion and most of all, The Springsteen Information Center values his journalistic integrity. Because of people like Stan, we can offer you all of the latest news for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band right here on The Springsteen Information Center. Enjoy!
Brucewrap2.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanBruce Springsteen and Steve Van Zandt dance the night away at MetLife Stadium last Saturday night, well really Sunday morning.

I’m still feeling it five days later, the buzz of witnessing three outstanding Bruce Springsteen shows in four nights at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford last Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.

As Bruce, members of his family and the E Street Band were finishing “Twist and Shout” at close to 2 a.m. Sunday, fireworks went off over the stadium completing what will go down as a legendary three-night stand.

From the first song, “Shackled and Drawn,” on Wednesday, to the finale on Saturday, Bruce played 89 songs, 61 of them different.

As I finally get my energy back (“maybe we ain’t that young anymore”), let’s take a look at some of the special moments from the swamps of Jersey.

The Saturday birthday show is going to be remembered for many reasons. One is for the delay due to the heavy rains that came through the area. The show, which normally would have started around 8:20 to 8:30 p.m. began at 10:27 p.m.

As Wilson Pickett’s “In the Midnight Hour” played over the PA, Bruce took the stage and said: “I think I just invited 55,000 people to my birthday party.”

And it was quite the party. A 33-song, 3:09 show with four tour premieres and Bruce mentioning all night that it was his birthday.

During one of those premieres, “Cynthia” Bruce said: “Ahh you’re looking good. When you’re 63 everyone looks ****** good.”

Bruce did quite a bit of cursing over the final two shows.

BrucewrapupMom.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanBruce Springsteen celebrates his 63rd birthday with his mother Adele at MetLife Stadium on Saturday.

After a wild seven-song start (“Out in the Street,” “The Ties That Bind,” “Cynthia,” “Badlands,” “Who’ll Stop the Rain,” “Cover Me,” and “Downbound Train”), Bruce settled into his normal four-pack of “We Take Care of Our Own,” “Wrecking Ball,” “Death to My Hometown,” and “My City of Ruins.”
Before “My City of Ruins” Bruce said: “We made it!” That’s right! Tonight I’m going to be another year older, IF I don’t get a lightning bolt up my ass.”“I don’t think I’ve played on my birthday, let me see, before the cellphone, before the internet. I believe it was before the manually operated hair dryer. That’s right, you used to not be able to dry your own hair when I played on my birthday the last time.”

Actually the last time Springsteen played on Sept. 22 was in 1992 when he was filmed in a Hollywood studio in front on an audience for MTV’s “Unplugged” series. Last time he played an actual show on his birthday was on Sept. 23, 1988 in Oakland, Calif., on the Amnesty tour.

On Saturday, as he began “It’s Hard to be a Saint in the City” Bruce talked about the start of his career.

“I was 22 years old and took a bus from Asbury Park to New York City. Let’s hear it for public transit. Went up, up, up in the elevator in the Columbia Records building, went into an office and I had my guitar and sat down, and this was the song that got me my record deal.”

Brucewrapupcake5.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanBruce Springsteen brings pieces of his birthday cake to fans.

Gary U.S. Bonds returned for a second straight night to join in on “Jole Blon” and “This Little Girl” before “Pay Me My Money Down” a song that was a highlight of the Seeger Sessions shows in 2006.It was after midnight when Bruce finished his 16th song of the night “Janey Don’t You Lose Heart,” and the crowd started to serenade him with “Happy Birthday.”

“All right, let’s hear it. Are we past 12 o’clock? Is it my birthday? Well then let me hear by birthday song!” Bruce said.

He then called on the band to play “In the Midnight Hour.” ”I’m an old man!” he said. It was the first time “In the Midnight Hour” was played at an E Street Band show since the legendary Dec. 31, 1980 performance at the Nassau Coliseum.

A touching moment came next as Bruce dedicated “Into the Fire” (a tour premiere) to fallen New York City firefighter Rich Nappi and his wife Mary Anne. Nappi, a huge Springsteen fan and a friend to many of us, died while fighting a fire in Brooklyn in April. His friends and family had a big tailgate prior to the show to celebrate the life of the guy we knew as “Fire Rich.”

The main set ended, for the second straight night, with a classic Springsteen back-to-back from an album. “Meeting Across the River” played by just Bruce, a fantastic Curt Ramm on trumpet and Garry Tallent on bass segued into “Jungleland,” where Jake Clemons nailed his late uncle’s signature solo.

After playing “Thunder Road” to kick off the encores, Bruce reflected on the evening.

“Thank you for being with us tonight, and I want to thank you for your patience, we appreciate it,” he said. “Hey I’m glad I got to see you on my birthday, or did I mention, today’s  my birthday? I thought I forgot to mention that, it slipped my mind. Yes, yes! It’s a good one. I’m going to sleep the rest of it away.”

Brucewrapupcake3.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanNils Lofgren and Steve Van Zandt look on as Bruce Springsteen delivers pieces of his birthday cake to fans on Saturday night.

Next up was “Glory Days,” played the only time of the three nights. “It’s my birthday” Bruce again said as he started the song.  In the middle of it, he said “Hey Steve, did I mention it’s my birthday?”Steve: “No you didn’t mention it!”Talk about Abbott and Costello!More fun continued as “Seven Nights to Rock,” a cover of the 1956 Moon Mullican song, was played for the first time in the U.S. on the tour.

“Dancing in the Dark” saw Bruce with a special dance partner, Steve’s wife Maureen Van Zandt who also played Silvio’s wife, Gabriella Dante, on “The Sopranos.”

After the tribute to Clarence Clemons on “Tenth Avenue Freeze-out” the evening ended with a full-fledged birthday party with 55,000 guests.

As Bruce’s mother Adele came out, Steve said “The boss of bosses has just come on stage. The person responsible for all this.

‘”Yes, she had her work cut out for her 63 years ago,” Bruce followed up.

BrucewrapupAdeleGinny.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanJake Clemons looks on as Bruce Springsteen’s mother Adele, and his oldest sister Ginny join in on “Twist and Shout” on Saturday.

Joining Adele was Bruce’s oldest sister Ginny, his mother-in-law Pat and his brother-in-law Michael Scialfa as a guitar-shaped birthday cake was brought out.“Oh I’m surprised. This is going to take all night now. That’s enough. I just winded myself. That’s about all I can handle,” he said as he blew out some candles and then cut the cake.

As the entire band came down to the front, Steve led a singalong of “Happy Birthday.”

“Cake for everybody” Steve yelled. “The first piece goes to Obie, our first fan, right there.” As Bruce handed Obie, known as “Fan No. 1,” who was in the front row, a slice.

Bruce: “Obie we love you. Obie was following us when we were 16. We love you O!”

Bruce gave out a few more slices of cake before realizing he didn’t have any more plates.

“Someone give me a guitar quick,” he said. “All right, she’s (his Mom) going to join the backup singers, 87 years old. Are you ready? It’s going to be loud as hell! We have any earplugs? Can a man deafen his own mother on his birthday? I don’t know.

“I can deafen my mother-in-law I guess, I can’t deafen my mother.”

That led into a superfun “Twist and Shout” as fireworks were set off at the top of the stadium.

As the song ended, Bruce saluted the crowd.

 

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012

Enlarge Jennifer Brown/The Star-LedgerBruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium, as the Wrecking Ball Tour plays September 22, 2012.  The show was delayed due to storms. (Jennifer Brown/The Star-Ledger)The Boss waits out the rain to perform at MetLifegallery (11 photos)

  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the last of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 22, 2012

 

“Thank you for being here with us tonight! We love Jersey! Thank you for your patience, we had a great night. And did I mention, it’s my birthday! Mike Scialfa, my brother-in-law, it’s his birthday too. What are the odds?”

 

“Thank you! We love you. Thank you Jersey. Drive safe going home. My mother is for rent for $250 an hour to any parties and Bar Mitzvahs.

“Thanks for a memorable birthday!” We love you, thanks so much for a great night. Thanks for three great nights.”

Now, how ’bout that Friday show, which was my favorite of the three.
I wrote on my blog afterward that it was fun. And looking back a few days later, I still smile and laugh when I think of its highlights.

When Bruce opens with a world premiere  — “Living on the Edge of the World”  — from the “Tracks” box set, you just knew it was going to be a special evening.

It wasn’t perfectly played, Bruce struggled with the words, but it was cool to hear.

“That (would have been) even better if we had got it right,” Bruce said.

BruceSoozie.JPGPhoto by Eason JordanBruce Springsteen and Soozie Tyrell play away on Friday night.

An early highlight was a very intense “Lost in the Flood.”  Great guitar work by Bruce

Every night at MetLife saw a poignant “My City of Ruins.”  On Friday, Bruce said: “Good evening, good evening. My people!” He mentioned how he wrote the song for his adopted hometown.

“It’s doing pretty good.  Who’s been to Asbury Park lately? It’s nice, it’s nice,”  he said.

“Tonight we got a lot of old faces and new faces in the E Street Band, and there’s old faces and new faces in the crowd. Whose never seen the E Street Band before? “ he asked to a small response. “All right, all right, we’re going to do it right for you.”

And as he’s been doing this whole tour, Bruce talked about ghosts. “When you’re a kid, ghosts frighten you.  But as you get older, you realize ghosts are there to walk with you and give you an appreciation of time, preciousness of life, the value of the day, the goodness of things. They’re always all around you,” he said. “We stand blessed in their presence, the people who have come before us and left us with things and given us their love, and worked for us and sacrificed for us, and fought alongside us. So I’m going to do this tonight for all your ghosts. For all the missing brothers and sisters, fathers and mothers and friends and for our ghosts too.

“This is always my favorite time of year,” he continued. “I can pass on a lot of the summer.  After January, New Jersey is deadly. But right here at the very end of summer, beginning of fall, you can feel everything in motion. New things coming, things leaving, people coming, people going.  This is when we used to have a little house party and put all the furniture out in the backyard. We’d get everybody over and get the grill out and see who was there and who was missing.”

Next up was another fun spot, “Does This Bus Stop at 82nd Street” from the “Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.” album.  “I wrote this on the bus traveling through New York City,” Bruce said. “I had some friends who let me crash up on 82nd Street when I was writing music for my first record.”

Then he kidded piano player “Professor” Roy Bittan.

“Professor don’t (mess) it up. Professor usually (messes) this one up bad, don’t (mess) this one up. I’m watching you!” he said.

 

BrucewrapupNight2Bonds.jpgPhoto by Eason JordanGary US Bonds, second from right, joins Jake Clemons, Bruce Springsteen and Steve Van Zandt on stage at Friday’s show.

That led into the evening’s special guest, Gary U.S. Bonds, and performances of “Jole Blon” and “This Little Girl.” Bonds was back to sing the same two songs on Saturday.
Bruce said Bonds “came all the way down on that Long Island Expressway, that’s worse than the Turnpike man.”  Bruce had seen a sign for “Jole Blon.”
“This sign right here, I’ve seen at 95 shows,” he said. Bruce asked her how long she’d been carrying the sign. “My whole life” she said into the microphone.
“She’s even got the right key! There’s a prepared fan right there,” he said.

 

Another tour premiere, “From Small Things (Big Things One Day Come),” was next after Bruce saw a sign for it. An outtake from “The River” sessions, it is on the 3-CD “Essentials” set. It has only been played a handful of times at E Street Band shows over the years.

The evening’s highlight for many was next.

Bruce performed “Talk to Me” off “The Promise” and probably better known to many from New Jersey as one of Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes’ signature songs.

It had been played only four times this tour, including the May 2 show at the Prudential Center in Newark.

The best way to describe it is for you to watch the video below as Bruce tries to explain what to do when you are in trouble with your significant other. WARNING: some may find Bruce’s language offensive. He drops a few F-bombs.

<iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/Lbni6lWrodE?feature=player_embedded” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

“This Depression,” one of the lesser played songs off of “Wrecking Ball,” changed the tone. It was only the fourth time it has been played.

A song Bruce fans got very tired from past tours, “Mary’s Place” made a nice reappearance. It hadn’t been played since the first rehearsal show of the Working on a Dream tour (March 23, 2009 at Asbury Park’s Convention Hall). Bruce used to do a long rap during “Mary’s Place” on the Magic tour about “building a house” and drew the song out far too long. Just played straight, it was good to hear.

Closing the main set was another of the ultimate Springsteen back-to-backs: “Incident on 57th Street” into “Rosalita.” The tracks are next to each other on “The Wild, the Innocent and the E Street Shuffle.”

Only the third time since 1980 the songs had been played together. As the final piano notes of “Incident” were played, you could feel the anticipation for the first guitar chords of “Rosalita.”

“Incident” was beautiful and “Rosalita” was more fun. Bruce and Steve really hammed it up on the front center extension.

The encores featured “Ramrod” – more fun between Steve and Bruce, and “Bobby Jean,” a song that’s not one of my favorites, but it has not been overplayed lately.

“Dancing in the Dark” saw people dancing all over the place.

BrucewrapupDaniellecrop.jpgPhoto by Ryan DeCarolisDanielle DeCarolis asked to dance with Springsteen guitar tech Kevin Buell, but instead got to dance with Steve Van Zandt on Friday night.

A friend, Danielle DeCarolis had a sign asking to dance with (guitar tech) Kevin Buell. Bruce let her come on stage but she couldn’t find Kevin, so she ended up dancing with Little Steven. Another friend, Kiley Armstrong, had a sign asking if she could dance with a tech and Bruce brought her up. There was also a woman dancing with backup singer Curtis King among others and Bruce had his own dance partner.  Did I mention it was fun?

Show ended with “American Land.”

Interesting note: There were no songs played from “Darkness on the Edge of Town.” Only the second time that’s happened at an E Street Band show since 1977.

Bruce plays a surprise two-song acoustic set for early arriving fans on Wednesday:

The opening show on Wednesday began with an exclusive preshow for early arrivals. As fans entered the front general-admission pit around 5:30 p.m., Bruce, after finishing his sound check, came down to the front of the pit and greeted many fans with a handshake and posed for some pictures. He then took the stage and played two acoustic songs “Growin’ Up” and “For You.”

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012

Enlarge Saed Hindash/The Star-LedgerBruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the second of three nights at MetLife Stadium, as the Wrecking Ball Tour returns to the area Friday night September 21, 2012.  They will also play September 22. Saed Hindash/The Star-Ledger   Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012gallery (26 photos)

  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform their second show at MetLife Stadium September 21, 2012

 

Wednesday’s special guest was original E Street Band drummer  Vini “Maddog” Lopez who played drums on “E Street Shuffle” and later played the tambourine on two songs during the encores.

Also, it was the only show that Patti Scialfa was at and “Easy Money” (always played when Patti is there) returned to the set list. That led to “Shackled and Drawn” as the show’s opener for the first time this tour. “Shackled” is always a highlight of these shows and backup singer Cindy Mizelle does an excellent job. Quick trivia: Mizelle’s son, Devin Fuller, is a freshman quarterback for UCLA.

It was also the only show Bruce crowd-surfed. He jumped in from the back of the pit during “Hungry Heart” and it was a long way and took him a long time to make it back to the stage. I guess he thought he better not attempt it again. On Friday and Saturday he instead ran through openings set off by barriers that allowed him to go to the back of the pit.

I thought Wednesday’s show got off to a slow start but picked up with the tour premiere of “Mansion on the Hill” a Bruce and Patti duet into an absolutely stunning “Racing in the Street.” Bittan’s piano reached new horizons.

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012

Enlarge Saed Hindash/The Star-LedgerBruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium, as the Wrecking Ball Tour returns to the area Wednesday night September 19, 2012.  They will also play September 20th and 21st. Saed Hindash/The Star-Ledger   Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012gallery (24 photos)

  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012
  • Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band perform the first of three nights at MetLife Stadium September 19, 2012

 

Bruce said “Mansion on the Hill” was one of the first songs he wrote for “Nebraska.” He talked about going to the Jersey Freeze (in Freehold) as a kid with his parents and grandparents. He said he didn’t really like ice cream, but he liked the cones, so they would cut up the cones and save them for him. Also how there was a big radio tower on the edge of town and his mother would tell him that it was a big giant, and the red lights were the giant’s buttons.

The Wednesday show ran 3:46, the longest of the three.

Some final notes: It was like the United Nations at the shows. Fans traveled to New Jersey from all over the world. There was a group of close to 100 who came in from England. I met fans from all over Europe, Brazil, Canada and Australia. Even driving through Asbury Park and Freehold last week, I saw many fans from all over with cameras checking out the Springsteen sites.

Bruce has played 161 different songs over his 67 shows this tour.

Next show isn’t until Oct. 19 at Scotiabank Place in Ottawa, Ontario. A well deserved break for fans and the band.

There are 18 arena shows scheduled on this leg with the final one on Dec.6 in Glendale, Ariz. Will this be the end of the tour? My guess is no.  I believe you’ll see Bruce and the band back next year for more shows in Europe and another leg or two in the U.S. Going by past Springsteen tour history, I bet we see dates starting in late February, early March running to the end of summer of 2013.

The three nights will go down as a legendary three-night stand (instant classic as they say on the Yes Network). It’s another spectacular chapter in the Bruce Springsteen history book. The man continues to raise the bar higher and higher and is able to jump over that bar every time.

Even at 63, he’s the Energizer Bunny, still going and as Frank Sinatra sung “The Best is Yet to Come.”

Follow @Stan_Goldstein

Bovella’s Bakes Bruce Springsteen’s Birthday Cake

New take on ‘Cake Boss’: Westfield bakery sweetens up The Boss’s 63rd birthday.

Celebrating a birthday like a rock star just got a little bit easier for Westfielders. Saturday night, legendary musician Bruce Springsteen received a birthday cake specially prepared by Bovella’s Pastry Shoppe, located on

the corner of East Broad and Elm streets in downtown Westfield

Credit Courtesy of Bovella’s

The 63-year-old “Boss” enjoyed not only a “Happy Birthday” sing-along during his concert at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, but also a cake fashioned into a life-size replica of his guitar.

Bovella’s owner Ralph Bencivenga, who attended Westfield High School, said he received a call midday Saturday from a former classmate who works with celebrities. She told the baker she needed a cake for the New Jersey-born rocker’s birthday later that evening.

Working from a photo, Bencivenga and his crew then spent the next six hours creating the true-to-size confection that mimics the yellow and black Fender Telecaster Bruce plays. The white cake featured a Bavarian cream filling along with fresh strawberries, raspberries and blackberries.

Talk about an on-the-job perk, Bencivenga said the driver who delivered the cake not only had the chance to go backstage but was also given front-row seats.

“He was pretty happy,” Bencivenga said. “He’s a big Bruce Springsteen fan.”

After the ‘Born to Run’ icon cut into his birthday cake, which was transported on a 2×4 picked up at a local Home Depot, he then handed the first two slices to concert-goers, one of whom he referred to as his “oldest fan” who’s been following him since he was 16.

Bencivenga said one of several highlights from the whole experience was seeing Bruce lick the frosting from his fingers after he handed out those first two slices. (See the attached YouTube video for a peek at the birthday boy sampling the icing.)

While Bencivenga said Bovella’s has baked cakes for other celebrities, Bruce is definitely “the biggest.”

So how did the 22-time Grammy award winner enjoy his birthday cake?

“Everyone said it looked and tasted great,” Bencivenga said. “It was pretty exciting to have our cake seen by 55,000 people.”

To order a cake or learn more about the bakery, visit Bovella’s website or call 908-232-4149.

Quick Thoughts on Bruce Springsteen and Customer Service

It’s 2 a.m. Sunday morning at Metlife Stadium in New Jersey. A severe thunderstorm had delayed the show’s start until 10:30 p.m., yet Bruce Springsteen still poured his heart and soul into a full concert for us fans who had gone to great cost and effort to get tickets and make it to the stadium. And his full show isn’t the ordinary musician’s 75 minute set with 15 minutes of encores. This was his typical 3.5 hour marathon with Bruce running around the large stage, into the crowd, jumping on the piano, signing, dancing, playing hits, rarities, covers, bringing out guest stars, dancing with audience members, and making every one of us 55,000 fans feel personally connected.

Plus, at midnight it had become his 63rd birthday, forcing him to break his rule of not playing shows on his birthday (since “before the age of cell phones”).

So here’s a test for the founder and CEO of the E Street Band (or any successful CEO). With his 87-year-old mother, his sister, mother-in-law, brother-in-law and loyal employees/friends (Stevie Van Zandt, Max Weinberg, Nils Lofgren, Roy Bittan, Garry Tallent) who have played with him for most of his life all on stage, who gets the first piece of cake?

Easy. Even after four decades of being a rock superstar and amassing “all the riches any man ever knew,” Bruce intuitively knows that he’s there for (and because of) us fans. Without skipping a beat, he grabbed the first piece of his “Happy Birthday Boss” guitar-shaped cake and ran it down to a woman described as “the band’s first fan.” And later he grabbed a few more slices and again brought them to fans.

Every CEO should take note.

Follow Richard Robbins on Twitter:  www.twitter.com/rich1

Bruce Springsteen To Stand Up For Heroes

For the sixth consecutive year, the Bob Woodruff Foundation (BWF) and the New York Comedy Festival (NYCF) are proud to present Stand Up for Heroes, an evening of comedy and music benefiting our injured service members, veterans and their families, taking place at the Beacon Theatre on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at 8 p.m.

Stand Up for Heroes honors the sacrifice of our returning service members, veterans and their families by offering support in the effort to heal the physical and psychological wounds of war.

The event, featuring performances by Mike Birbiglia, Ricky Gervais, Patton Oswalt, Jon Stewart, Bruce Springsteen and Robin Williams, is one of the centerpiece events of the 9th annual New York Comedy Festival, running Nov. 7-11, 2012, at venues throughout New York City. Tickets go on sale Sept. 24 through www.ReMIND.org or www.nycomedyfestival.com. Corporate sponsor packages and VIP benefit packages can be purchased by emailing SUFH@remind.org.

Stand Up for Heroes brings together leaders from business, entertainment and philanthropy to raise funds for the Bob Woodruff Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to investing in national and community-based programs that connect our troops to the help they need—from individual needs like physical accommodations, job training and financial counseling, to larger social issues like homelessness and suicide prevention; educating the public about the needs of service members returning from war; and collaborating with key federal, state and local experts to identify and solve issues related to the successful return of service members from combat to civilian life.

“As we approach 11 years at war, the Bob Woodruff Foundation remembers. Less than 1 percent of the nation’s population has stood up to serve overseas, many in multiple deployments, when their country asked them to go. And when our service members come home changed by the act of war, in need or looking for a new beginning, it is up to us as a nation to take care of our own and honor their sacrifices,” said Lee Woodruff, co-founder of the Bob Woodruff Foundation. “Stand Up for Heroes is a special evening full of uplifting moments that unify and inspire us to do more on behalf of the heroes in our midst.”

“Our veterans and returning service members are an inspiration to all of us, and we are so proud to once again partner with Bob and Lee Woodruff to help make sure our troops and families receive the support and services they require,” says Caroline Hirsch, founder of the New York Comedy Festival and owner of Carolines on Broadway.

The Bob Woodruff Foundation has invested more than $12 million to help wounded warriors and their families overcome the challenges they face as they transition and heal from the physical and hidden wounds of war. Funds raised at Stand Up for Heroes will be invested in programs that connect troops to the help they need—from physical rehabilitation and counseling, to education, employment and financial assistance, to help with larger issues like homelessness and suicide.

Now in its ninth year, the New York Comedy Festival (NYCF), in association with Comedy Central, will take place Nov. 7–11, 2012, in New York City with Stand Up for Heroes as one of the festival’s centerpiece events. The five-day festival will continue with an all-star lineup featuring some of the biggest names in the industry including Aziz Ansari, Adam Carolla, Rob Delaney, Jim Gaffigan, Ricky Gervais, Kevin Hart, Artie Lange, Bill Maher, Patton Oswalt, Brian Regan, Marlon and Shawn Wayans, and Robin Williams. The NYCF’s schedule will consist of more than 150 comedians performing in over 80 shows at iconic New York City venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Beacon Theatre, Madison Square Garden, Town Hall, the Apollo Theater and Carolines on Broadway

Celebrities

Charities

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Bruce Springsteen Turns 63: His Vegetarian Diet and Workout Secrets

 

Rocker Bruce Springsteen celebrated his 63rd birthday on Sept. 23, 2012 by bringing down the house with a stunning performance at the MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

Rocker Bruce Springsteen, 63, stays fit by running on the treadmill and lifting weights.
Rocker Bruce Springsteen, 63, stays fit by running on the treadmill and lifting weights.
      Credits:
        Jeff Fusco, Dimitrios Kambouris for Getty Images

Some 60,000 fans turned out for the concert, which ran until almost 2 a.m. due to a late, rain-delayed start. But the Boss didn’t disappoint, belting out over 30 tunes in an energetic and inspired performance.

At the end of the concert, the audience sang “Happy Birthday” to the ageless Springsteen, whose appearance has barely changed over the decades.

“He has practically the same waist size as when I met him, when we were 15,” singer Steve Van Zandt, 61, told the New Yorker. “I’m not remotely close.”

The super-fit Bruce is a health fanatic who follows a mostly vegetarian diet, lifts weights, and runs on the treadmill to stay fit. His workout routine has remained the same for the past 30 years.

Despite all his success and accolades, Springsteen battled a dark depression in the 1980s that left him suicidal.

Springsteen, who has undergone therapy to treat his crippling, suicidal depression, said he never did drugs because he saw how it destroyed his unstable, alcoholic father, who used to beat him as a kid.

“My parents’ struggles, it’s the subject of my life,” he recalled. “It’s the thing that eats at me and always will. My life took a very different course, but my life is an anomaly. Those wounds stay with you, and you turn them into a language and a purpose.”

Now happier and more emotionally settled, Springsteen enjoys life by relaxing with his wife, singer Patti Scialfa, 58, and his three children, and spending his free time exercising, reading and watching movies.

To date, Springsteen has sold over 120 million albums worldwide and has won 20 Grammy Awards, two Golden Globes and an Academy Award.

,      Celebrity Fitness and Health Examiner

Samantha Chang is the executive editor and co-owner of www.theimproper.com., an arts and entertainment website in New York City. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Samantha is a former financial journalist who enjoys running, cycling and music. Contact her at schang@theImproper.com.

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etLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

 

Some 60,000 fans turned out for the concert, which ran until almost 2 a.m. due to a late, rain-delayed start. But the Boss didn’t disappoint, belting out over 30 tunes in an energetic and inspired performance.

At the end of the concert, the audience sang “Happy Birthday” to the ageless Springsteen, whose appearance has barely changed over the decades.

“He has practically the same waist size as when I met him, when we were 15,” singer Steve Van Zandt, 61, told the New Yorker. “I’m not remotely close.”

The super-fit Bruce is a health fanatic who follows a mostly vegetarian diet, lifts weights, and runs on the treadmill to stay fit. His workout routine has remained the same for the past 30 years.

Despite all his success and accolades, Springsteen battled a dark depression in the 1980s that left him suicidal.

Springsteen, who has undergone therapy to treat his crippling, suicidal depression, said he never did drugs because he saw how it destroyed his unstable, alcoholic father, who used to beat him as a kid.

“My parents’ struggles, it’s the subject of my life,” he recalled. “It’s the thing that eats at me and always will. My life took a very different course, but my life is an anomaly. Those wounds stay with you, and you turn them into a language and a purpose.”

Now happier and more emotionally settled, Springsteen enjoys life by relaxing with his wife, singer Patti Scialfa, 58, and his three children, and spending his free time exercising, reading and watching movies.

To date, Springsteen has sold over 120 million albums worldwide and has won 20 Grammy Awards, two Golden Globes and an Academy Award.

Shure Axient System Used In Bruce Springsteen Tour

I am not sure if anyone else enjoys learning about the technical aspects of a rock n roll show like I do.  Gear is half of the story and I have tried to include that kind of information when I find it.  I believe it helps us better appreciate each performance and enlightens us as to problems the crew face and overcome at each and every venue.

In his first global tour since the tragic loss of sax man clarence Clemons, Bruce Springsteen went big.  With 18 musicians on stage, the Wrecking Ball tour has traveled from America to Europe and back, delivering Bruce’s trademark musical and emotional intensity to packed houses, mixed by engineer John Cooper on a sound system supplied by the Las Vegas office of Solotech. One thing that has changed is the choice of wireless systems. With a total of 68 channels of wireless microphones and in-ear monitoring systems in use and nearly 100 inputs, monitor engineers Monty Carlo and Troy Milner knew they had challenges ahead. Milner upgraded to eight channels of Shure PSM 1000 personal monitors when the tour began, and it wasn’t long before wireless mics became an issue. “Early in the tour, in San Jose, I had to work hard to find space for all my RF, and we had an interference issue on Bruce’s vocal channel,” recalls Monty Carlo, a veteran of every Springsteen tour since 1992. “I knew we’d be hitting several venues where it would be even more difficult to get clean RF, so I spoke with our tour director that night, and proposed we make a change to Shure Axient.” Within a few days, Solotech had a purchase order in place for 20 channels of Axient, making arrangements for the equipment to meet the tour in Barcelona, Spain. “Fortunately, we had two shows there, which gave me enough time to familiarize myself with the system and make the transition,” said Carlo. “I spent the first morning firing up Axient, getting it all labeled and ready to go. I walked the stadium floor with Bruce’s mic a few times and looked over the RF scans to see how it held up. Then I went back and matched gains and such, so the transition would be smooth.” Uniquely, Shure Axient wireless uses advanced frequency diversity technology to ensure that critical RF channels are essentially immune from interference. When deployed with its ShowLink access points, the system gives the engineer full remote control of all transmitter functions. The system is designed to handle frequency scanning and coordination, and can detect and avoid interference by changing to a spare channel on the fly. Taking full advantage of Axient’s technology package, Solotech ordered two ShowLink® access points, three Ethernet switches, and three antenna combiners along with the 20 core Axient channels on the Wrecking Ball tour. A separate rack houses the battery recharging station. All eight vocals are sung through Axient handheld SM58® transmitters, with bodypack systems in use for eight Beta 98H/C horn mics, three internally miked accordions, and a fiddle. “For Bruce’s vocal, I’m using the Frequency Diversity option, which allows me to broadcast on two different frequencies for seamless switching in case of RF interference on one of the channels,” details Carlo. “I’m also taking advantage of the system’s ability to have two packs linked with a receiver, which is great for the horn players who switch instruments mid-show. With the ShowLink system, if I need to make a change mid-show, the second bodypack will automatically switch to the new frequency when it’s turned on. That’s pretty cool.” For the first night in Barcelona, Carlo opted to stay with his existing racks of Shure UHF-R® systems, planning to fine-tune the tour’s new Axient systems the next day. “Of course, the first show was fantastic, and Bruce decided there was no reason to do a sound check the next day,” he says. “So I swapped out the wireless racks, let Bruce know that I’d changed his vocal wireless to the latest hot-lick system, and that was that. I was a little nervous at the beginning of the show, but everything went smoothly.” While Springsteen chooses to rely on proprietary Solotech floor wedges, in-ear monitors are still a significant presence on stage. “I’m using the PSM 1000 system for Max Weinberg, Garry Talent, several additional band members, plus guest artists and various tech crew members,” says monitor engineer Troy Milner. “It really has made my job much easier, and the band is very happy.” Shure’s new PSM 1000 uses diversity reception to combat dropouts, along with several other key features. “CueMode lets me walk the floor and check all my frequencies from a single bodypack, which is a huge time saver for me,” Milner reports. “The rechargeable battery system has also been great. Bruce’s shows typically run over three and a half hours, but I’m getting about 8-10 hours per charge, so I don’t have to worry about battery life anymore.” Milner is also impressed with the sound quality of the PSM 1000. “This is my first run with this system and I have to say, I’m blown away,” he says. “They sound great, and noise floor is so low, I almost don’t know I’m wearing a pack. This is the only in-ear unit I will be using from here on out on my other tours.” On show days, Monty Carlo scans the local RF environment with the Axient Spectrum Manager and Shure’s Wireless Workbench® 6 software. “The Spectrum Manager is a fantastic tool that I have come to find indispensable,” he says. “Not only does it find and deploy frequencies for the Axient system, but it shows me the local landscape, so I can tell the backline guys what areas to stay away from. I use WWB6 to find my primary and backup frequencies in the morning, then during the show to keep an eye on battery life and change RF transmitter power as needed,” he says. “Bruce likes to leave the stage a lot, and I change from 10 to 50 milliwatts when he does. And obviously, he’s known for doing long shows and there’s never a costume change, so the accuracy of the remote battery meters can also be really important.” Another advantage of switching to Axient was its wide tuning range, enabling the tour to use the same systems in Europe and North America. “When I switched to Axient, the RF world kind of opened up for me,” says Carlo. “We use the entire UHF range, 470 to 698 MHz, but I used to keep all my mics in the old J5 range, 578 to 638 MHz, with the rest for guitars, in-ears, etc. Because the receivers can operate over the entire 470-698 MHz range, it gives me much better options for situations where the RF environment is really crowded.” Having now used the Axient system throughout a summer in Europe and continuing on the tour’s return to North America, Monty Carlo has had plenty of time to evaluate its behavior under fire. “Bruce is as active as ever on stage. He runs around a lot, pours water all over himself to cool off, sometimes drops the mic, and occasionally get rained upon while running across the stadium floor,” Carlo reports. “Axient has dealt with it without a hiccup. Axient is at the top of my list of gear that makes the job easier. It’s been great.” Out at FOH, engineer John Cooper experiences the sound from a fan’s perspective. “Being a Front of House guy, my criteria for an RF mic is that it remains faithful to its original wired counterpart,” he notes. “The Shure Axient system is exactly that. It’s a great sense of relief to hear that true, natural sound of their voice being captured – like you are sitting beside the artist, listening to them sing. Axient is a great example of how Shure continues to develop better products that make a real difference in the quality I strive for in my live mixes. It’s just a fantastic system.”

Bruce Springsteen Joined Onstage by His Mother For His 63rd Birthday

Bruce Springsteen is still rocking out at 63 years old, and he’s not alone.

Bruce Springsteen, MomTwitter

The musician performed a show in New Jersey’s MetLife Stadium last night—which was delayed three hours because of rain and lightning—and since it was his birthday, who better to join him on stage than the woman that gave him life?!

Bruce Springsteen celebrated his 63rd birthday onstage until nearly 2 a.m. Sunday, joined at the end by his mom.

Adele Springsteen danced and sang background to “Twist and Shout,” walking offstage with her son and his band at nearly 2 a.m. Her only concession to age was a pair of hastily made earplugs.

She watched as her son cut a giant cake in the shape of a guitar, passing out pieces to some audience members.

His show in the open-air MetLife Stadium was delayed three hours Saturday by authorities because of a downpour and worries about lightning. Thousands of fans clustered on indoor ramps waiting for the rain to stop.

When it did, Springsteen and his E Street Band took the stage at 10:30 p.m. to the strains of Wilson Pickett’s “In the Midnight Hour,” a song they performed when the clock hit that mark. They also covered Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Who’ll Stop the Rain,” and it worked.

“Thank you for your patience,” Springsteen told the audience. He said it had been a long time since he had performed on his birthday.

It was the third of a three-night stand at his home state arena.

http://youtu.be/jIE4UYtolbE

Bruce Springsteen Who Stopped The Rain (Creedance) Septemeber 22nd, 2012 MetLife Stadium Night #3

Bruce Springsteen “Who’ll Stop The Rain” Video

http://youtu.be/97MQap2kkw4

Bruce Springsteen Celebrates 63rd Birthday With Family & 60,000 Fans in NJ

ByLauren MoraskiTopicsMusic

Bruce Springsteen And the E Street Band perform at Citizens Bank Park Sept. 2, 2012, in Philadelphia, Pa.

(Credit: Getty)

(CBS News) Bruce Springsteen celebrated his 63th birthday with his family, a guitar-shaped cake and some 50,000 fans over the weekend. The Boss, who turned 63 on Sunday, had a scheduled performance at Metlife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., Saturday as part of his Wrecking Ball tour. A thunderstorm delayed the gig by two hours, which meant Springsteen & the E Street Band didn’t go on until 10:30 p.m. ET. That also meant Springsteen, famous for three-hour-plus performances, was undoubtedly going to be performing at the stroke of midnight.

Pictures: Bruce Springsteen

When he first took the stage, Springsteen told the crowd, “I think I just invited you to my birthday party!”

The three-and-half-hour party kicked off with “Out in the Street” and continued as Springsteen plowed through hits, as well as deep cuts, such as “Janey, Don’t You Lose Heart” and “Cynthia.” As he’s done before in rainy outdoor gigs, Springsteen performed a cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Who’ll Stop the Rain.”

And his birthday remained a running theme throughout the rainy night. At one point, the New Jersey native said, “Tonight I’m going to be another year older if I don’t get a lightning bolt up my ass.” According to the Boss, it had been a long time since he had performed on his at least since the advent of mobile phones, he said. And probably even before that. “It’s a good one,” he said.

<iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/acXxt6XEJjM?feature=player_embedded” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>birthday –

Taking a trip down memory lane, Springsteen recalled the day he took the bus from New Jersey to Manhattan to audition at Columbia Records for the first time, a performance that resulted in a record deal. The song he played? “It’s Hard to Be a Saint in the City.” He played it again Saturday night, one of the highlights of a show that also included the tour premiere of “Into the Fire,” a “Rising” track, which he dedicated on Saturday to 9/11 FDNY firefighter Lt. Rich Nappi, who died in April in the line of duty while fighting a Brooklyn, N.Y., warehouse blaze. Singer Gary U.S. Bonds also joined the band for “Jole Blon” and “This Little Girl.”

When the clock struck midnight, Springsteen and the band launched into a version of Wilson Pickett’s “In the Midnight Hour.” The crowd sang a collective “Happy Birthday” for Springsteen, who throughout the show continued to joke, “It’s my birthday!” and “Did I mention it’s my birthday?”

His mom, for one, didn’t forget.

During the encore, she strutted on stage, along with Springsteen’s sister, mother-in-law and brother-in-law to roll out a massive cake. Springsteen received a second “Happy Birthday” audience sing-a-long and blew out the candles before breaking into “Twist and Shout,” while his 87-year-old mother sang — and even danced — along. In the middle of the song, Springsteen demanded more plates and proceeded to cut some of the cake himself, handing out a few pieces to some lucky fans in the front row.

“Thank you for your patience,” Springsteen told the crowd as his “birthday show” wrapped.

Another year older, but you wouldn’t believe it watching Springsteen in action.